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Agriculture and nutrition: a common future

December 12, 2014

Malnutrition costs children's lives, perpetuates poverty and slows economic growth: globally, child malnutrition costs the world economy more than US$100 billion per year.

The world has made progress in reducing malnutrition in recent years, particularly in reducing stunting and wasting. But the problem is still rampant: 170 million children less than five years old remain stunted, more than 2 billion people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies, and more than 800 million people are undernourished. Paradoxically, obesity is on the rise, even in countries still suffering from other forms of malnutrition. It is clear that more coordinated and innovative actions are required.

Agriculture and nutrition: A common future presents a framework for joint action by the European Commission, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Development (CTA) and the World Bank Group to promote agriculture for improving nutrition outcomes. It lays out how the four organisations will align their efforts to deliver concrete actions that make a difference to those most affected by malnutrition.

The framework identifies three strategic priorities that the partners will address through their joint efforts: 

  • Enhancing resource mobilisation and political commitment to strengthen the link between food and agricultural systems and nutrition
  • Scaling up proven nutrition-sensitive food and agriculture interventions at country level
  • Increasing knowledge and evidence to maximise the impact of food and agricultural systems on nutrition.

Read the full article.

Resources:

  • Framework for joint action "Agriculture and nutrition: A common future
  • Presentation of the framework by CTA’s Director, Michael Hailu, at CN2 Conference in November, 2014 http://ow.ly/EFDZQ
  • To learn more about the framework, watch FAO's webcast of the CN2 Side-event on Agricultural Policies and Food Systems for Improved Nutrition and scroll to 36:53.

Additional resources: