CTA Resources on cassava

CTA Articles

 

Bibliographical study of the cassava value chain in Central Africa (in French)

This bibliographical study of the cassava value chain in Central Africa identifies the various links in the cassava value chain in Central Africa, the institutions and actors involved in the value chain and describes their relationships and identifies current and recent initiatives for the development of the cassava value chain in Central Africa.

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Improving food and nutrition security through the cassava value chain
Regional consultation for the implementation of the CTA business plan for 2016–2019 in Central Africa

With a view to helping improve food and nutrition security in Central Africa, the CTA has redefined the scope of its action around the development and promotion of the roots and tubers sectors, and more specifically the cassava value chain in the region.

Read the article on cta.int

 

Strengthening food and nutrition security through cassava

A consultation is taking place between CTA and PRASAC on the development of the cassava value chain in Central Africa.

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Innovative drying technology for small-scale cassava industries

Moving from traditional sun drying to labour-saving and innovative steam drying technology

S.E.B. Nonie, B.D. James and S.J. Alpha

Value addition increases the; shelf-life of the cassava crop, availability of finished products e.g. fermented cassava flour ("fufu") and unfermented High Quality Cassava Flour (HQCF) which can be used as a wheat flour substitute and earning potential. Yet, access to efficient drying technology is a major constraint. Traditional sun-drying is very slow, inefficient and impractical for year-round production of high quality flour. It is typically limited to at most one batch per day. In the wet or rainy season, it may take between three and five days to dry the same batch. The steam dryer was developed to provide small-scale processors with drying technology that did not depend solely on the sun. In Sierra Leone this innovation is used by seven smallholder cassava processing centres.

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Casava: The root crop of the century

Cassava is a versatile crop that is vital for food security. ACP countries are therefore promoting the development of cassava value chains, including processing, marketing and research.

Millions of Africans, Asians and Latin Americans – often smallholders – rely on cassava for subsistence, especially during the lean season, and as a source of income. The roots and leaves are generally prepared and consumed in simple ways, but there is a growing trend towards processing cassava roots into flour, semolina (atieke), pasta or chips. Livestock feed is another use.

Read the article on Spore magazine

 

Growing cassava in Grenada: Bernadette's story

The Caribbean Network of Rural Women Producers (CANROP) is a network of women processors/producers working together to improve the economic, social and environmental status of women farmers, their families, communities and the Caribbean region. GRENROP is the Grenada chapter of CANROP, representing rural women there. One of GRENROP's members is Bernadette, whose story is an inspirational example of the way certain traditional crops are helping to secure an adequate nutrition today in the Caribbean.

Read the article on cta.int 

 

Some Caribbean countries transitioning to Cassava flour

At least three Caribbean countries – Barbados, Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago – are selling sliced bread made partly from cassava flour instead of only the regular wheat flour.

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Cassava is a viable substitute to the importation of wheat and corn

Currently at least three Caribbean countries – Barbados, Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago – are selling sliced bread made partly from cassava flour instead of only the regular wheat flour and another five have had training in a bid to have the region use more cassava and its products.

Read the article on cta.int

 

Confronting the aflatoxin challenge in Africa

Aflatoxins are one of the many 'silent' threats to the African continent's food supply. A new report points the way to fighting aflatoxin contamination and reducing exposure levels.

Read the article on cta.int

 


CTA Publications

Innovative Drying Technology for Small-scale Cassava Industries

From sun drying to steam drying

For cassava producers, value addition is important both to increase the shelf-life of the crop and to make new products which fetch more income. Such value-added cassava products include fermented cassava flour (normally referred to as 'fufu' flour), and the unfermented High Quality Cassava Flour (HQCF), which is gaining market popularity for its suitability as a wheat flour substitute. However, the need for an efficient drying technology is a major constraint in the flour-making process.
Traditionally, the production of cassava flour relies on sun-drying, which is very slow, inefficient and impractical for year-round drying in areas where rains fall for a large part of the year. In the sunny season, sun-drying is typically limited to one batch per day at most. In the wet or rainy season, it may take between 3 and 5 days to dry the same batch. This puts a severe limitation on the sun-drying method where premium is placed on volume of output and quality of products. High-end dryers such as Flash dryers require regular supply of electricity, making them expensive to acquire and maintain. Hence they are normally outside the range of the rural farmer.

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Producing Gari from Cassava

An illustrated guide for smallholder cassava processors

B. James, R. Okechukwu, A. Abass, S. Fannah, B. Maziya-Dixon, L. Sanni, A. Osei-Sarfoh, S. Fomba, S. Lukombo

Gari – a popular and increasingly marketable food in West Africa – is one of many food products that can be produced from fresh cassava roots. This practical guide focuses on building the capacity of smallholder farmers and food processors to produce gari as a profitable business. Easy to follow, it uses photographs to illustrate how to design a cassava processing centre, selecting techniques to improve product quality, good hygiene practices and expanding your market.

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Cassava: Production and processing

Eaten by both humans and animals, and with more than 20 derivative products, cassava offers considerable opportunities for income and advantages for food security. This versatile shrub is widely used in the food, textiles and other industries. For example, cassava tubers may be sold for preparation into pastries, tapioca, food pasta or chips, while the plant's by-products include paper, glues and alcohol. Attractively laid out, with step-by-step guides and a wealth of colourful figures, illustrations and tables, this handbook makes simple techniques available to cassava producers, improving production, storage and processing.

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Cassava in the third millennium: Modern production, processing, use and marketing systems

Author:Opina, B., Ceballos, H.

Cassava in the third Millennium summarises the accumulated knowledge and experience of scientists over more than 40 years of cassava research. A veritable 'new testament to cassava science', the book focuses on applied results that will be of a valuable resource for growers, processors and consumers. The text has been updated to reflect the last decade's advances and challenges, and contains 27 peer-reviewed papers from CIAT, CLAYUCA and other scientists. Describing 'production, processing, use and marketing systems' across the tropics, the book can be used together with the Practical handbook for managing cassava diseases, pests and nutritional disorders (no. 1713).

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Practical handbook for managing cassava diseases, pests and nutritional disorders

Author:Alvarez, E., Belloti, A. et al

Providing an overview of more than 40 years of cassava research, this practical handbook is a visual complement to Cassava in the third Millennium (no. 1712). With innumerable photos and clear descriptions, it serves as an indispensable aid in the identification of major cassava pests, diseases and nutritional disorders. Presented as a pocketbook, the text will be of interest to professionals, technicians, trained farmers and agronomy teachers and students.

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Making High-Quality Cassava Flour

CTA Practical Guide Series, No. 5

Importance and benefits of cassava
Cassava is not fully utilised in Eastern Africa compared to West Africa (Nigeria, Ghana). Cassava can earn you extra income, provide employment opportunities and serve as a reserve food in times of scarcity.

Cassava is drought tolerant, easy to grow and simple to harvest. All parts of the cassava plant are valuable. Cassava leaves can be used to make soup or as feed for livestock, the stems can be used for planting more cassava, for mushroom production or as firewood, the root can be cooked and eaten fresh or processed into flour. Cassava can also meet industrial needs such as the production of bio-fuel and starch for use in paper- and drug-making industries.

High-quality cassava flour is made within a day of harvesting the root. It is very white, has low fat content, is not sour like traditional, fermented cassava flour, does not give a bad smell or taste to food products and can mix very well with wheat flour for use in bread or cakes.

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Adding Value to Local Foods for Food and Nutrition Security: Myth or Strategic Option
Roadmap for the Foundation of a Sustainable Cassava Industry in Jamaica

Report of the Cassava Value Chain Workshop November 29th, Kingston, Jamaica
by Chadwick Anderson PhD

The Cassava Value Chain Roadmap was developed from the proceedings of a national workshop held on November 29, 2012 in Kingston, Jamaica and attended by nearly 60 participants representing a wide cross-section of stakeholders. The national workshop was held as an off shoot of the regional workshop Adding value to Local Foods for Food and Nutrition Security: Myth or Strategic Option – Leveraging the Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Network, November 26-29. Industry experts, researchers and practitioners delivered key presentations on various aspects of the industry, including the gaps, and indicated some proposed solutions or options for consideration.

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