Leveraging CTA’s innovation experiences

 

Articles

Impact Stories

Championing women and organic coffee farming in Jamaica

 Shari-Ann Palmer
by Shari-Ann Palmer

Vibrant reggae music, athletic prowess, flavoursome food and white sandy beaches are perhaps what Jamaica is best known for. Also coffee – but not so much the organic version. For over 20 years, Dorienne Rowan-Campbell has been working hard to change that.

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Impact story

Women-led agribusiness in Samoa reaches global markets

Imagine a small women-led organisation in a remote Pacific island nation supplying products sold in more than 3,000 shops in 66 countries. Women in Business Development Incorporated (WIBDI), a non-profit organisation working with 1,000 farming families in Samoa is doing just that, and much more.

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Blog articles

Guarantee funds unlock finance for agri-entrepreneurship in West Africa

 Marnie Pannatier
by Marnie Pannatier

Timely completion of field preparation and grain harvesting is a major challenge for rice farmers across sub-Saharan Africa. A new business model led by young people is providing mechanised services to farmers for activities such as soil preparation and harvesting, helping them to intensify production and improve their income as a result.

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in Blog Blog

Innovative partnerships based on shared value accelerate the upscaling of CSA solutions

Many climate-smart agriculture (CSA) innovations have been developed to help farmers achieve the triple wins of adaptation, productivity and, where possible, reduced emissions. As efforts by different organisations move forward to improve adoption, it is clear that a wide range of factors influence uptake of CSA. Field experiences with CSA projects in three countries highlight how developing shared value among partners has supported the scaling up of CSA.

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in Blog Blog

Helping women farmers to succeed through improved access to basic infrastructure

Much greater focus is needed on infrastructure development in rural farming communities, to help modernise the equipment that women use to farm, relieve some of the drudgery of the tasks that they undertake, lower the risks to which they are exposed, and reduce the post-harvest losses that significantly affect their overall earnings as primary agricultural producers.

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in Blog Blog

Leveraging socio-cultural push and pull factors to benefit women in agribusiness

All communities are characterised by social norms, cultural values and spiritual beliefs that shape, define and set relational behaviours and standards. Unfortunately, women are often burdened by socio-cultural norms and values that have negative consequences – this is true of most communities in ACP countries. There is a strong case to review how these affect women’s engagement in agribusiness – and explore how social cultural factors and norms can be used to women’s advantage.

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Events