Catherine Mungai

Partnerships and policy specialist, CCAFS

Partnerships and policy specialist, CCAFS

Catherine Mungai

Biography

Catherine Mungai is a DAAD scholar and holds an MSc in Environmental Governance (MEG) from the University of Freiburg in Germany. She also has a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Journalism and Communication from Makerere University and a Bachelor of Environmental Studies and Community Development degree from Kenyatta University. Prior to joining CCAFS, Catherine worked as an advocacy and publicity assistant with GenderCC–Women for Climate Justice an advocacy organization based in Berlin, championing the mainstreaming of gender in climate change negotiations. She also has experience in wetlands management and conservation which she acquired while she worked as a Wetlands Programme Officer at the East African Wildlife Society in Nairobi. She was part of the team charged with developing the Kenya Wetlands Forum Strategic Plan. She joined CCAFS as Programme Specialist focusing on expanding learning partnerships and supporting the policy engagement processes in CCAFS focus countries in East Africa and also at the global level on integrating climate change and agriculture policies. Catherine also offers technical support on the knowledge sharing platform known as the Climate and Agriculture Network for Africa (CANA) which seeks to promote dialogue between policymakers and scientists on food security, agriculture and climate change matters.

Catherine is also a Post Masters Fellow under the Climate Impact Research Capacity and Leadership Enhancement in Sub-Saharan Africa (CIRCLE) programme. During the course of the fellowship, she undertook research on examining the uptake of climate-smart agriculture technologies and practices through a gender lens.

Articles

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Community seed banks offer a sustainable way to improve access to high-value seeds, creating viable community-based businesses and maintaining biodiversity. In addition, community seed banks contribute to farmer adaptation. They also indirectly enhance household income diversification, community seed systems, and gender outcomes at community level.

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Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is increasingly gaining momentum as countries develop technologies and practices to combat the impacts of climate change. But while the concept of CSA may seem obvious, it is more complex than it appears. This is compounded by the fact that most countries have not developed clear indicators for CSA technologies and practices. Questions remain as to how CSA differs from other types of agriculture, and what needs to be done differently to qualify as CSA.

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